Attend 2015 MRS Spring Meeting & Exhibit

Docket DOC 2017‐0003, Administration Report on Significant Trade Deficits

Concerning section A subparagraph (e) identify imports and trade practices that may be impairing the national
security of the United States. https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2017‐07827/p‐16

China supplies over 95% of the US demand for rare earth elements. These elements comprise critical components
of many of our modern‐day technological devices and everyday electronics. REE demand in the United States is
projected to increase given global demand for green and sustainable products in energy, military, and
manufacturing uses. In 1984, the Molycorp Minerals, Inc. mine in Mountain Pass, CA, supplied 100 percent of U.S.
demand and 33 percent of the world’s demand for rare earths. The mine was shut down in 2002 for a variety of
reasons, and since that time, China has become the world’s leading producer of REEs, handling approximately 95
percent of worldwide production. (PA 600/R‐12/572 | December 2012 | www.epa.gov/ord Rare Earth Elements: A
Review of Production, Processing, Recycling, and Associated Environmental Issues).

Eutectix operates factories in Arizona and Michigan that manufacture rare earth materials critical to military and
industrial manufacturing. Eutectix acquired these facilities after market factors drove both predecessor companies
to bankruptcy leaving China as the dominant supplier.

Eutectix has retained our capability for making these products, but has lost the core of our magnet alloy powder
and rare earth conversion businesses. Eutectix currently makes many other high purity alloy products, such as
superalloy rods or master alloys and hydrogen storage alloys.

Eutectix acquired facilities in Troy, Michigan from the Canadian junior mining concern, Great Western Minerals
Group, Ltd in May, 2014. In April of 2016, we acquired the former MolyCorp Metals and Alloys plant in Tolleson,
Arizona. The Tolleson plant had ceased operating in December of 2015 and had been busy processing samarium
cobalt (SmCo) magnet alloy powders and iron neodymium boron (FeNdB) magnet powders. Eutectix has
production capability to convert rare earth (and scandium) oxides and fluorides to high purity metal in its Tolleson
plant.

We strongly support the notion that the U.S. must increase its competitiveness in the market for rare earth
elements and advanced materials.

We urge the administration to take meaningful action to
• reduce rare earth materials supply risk
• level the playing field for rare earth materials and value added products made from them


Eutectix Supports H.R. 1407 METALS Act

Hunter Introduces H.R. 1407 METALS Act to Curtail U.S. Dependence on Foreign-Sourced Strategic and Critical Materials http://bit.ly/2nzQSoH

Eutectix supports H.R. 1407 to incentivize the U.S. military to obtain rare earth materials made in America.

Eutectix operates factories in Arizona and Michigan that manufacture rare earth materials critical to military and industrial manufacturing. Eutectix acquired these facilities after market factors drove both predecessor companies to bankruptcy leaving China as the dominant supplier.

Eutectix has retained our capability for making these products, but has lost a substantial amount of our magnet alloy powder and rare earth conversion businesses. Eutectix currently makes many other high purity alloy products, such as superalloy rods or master alloys and hydrogen storage alloys.

Eutectix acquired facilities in Troy, Michigan from the Canadian junior mining concern, Great Western Minerals Group, Ltd in May, 2014. In April of 2016, we acquired the former MolyCorp Metals and Alloys plant in Tolleson, Arizona. The Tolleson plant had ceased operating in December of 2015 and had been busy processing samarium cobalt (SmCo) magnet alloy powders and iron neodymium boron (FeNdB) magnet powders. Eutectix has production capability to convert rare earth (and scandium) oxides and fluorides to high purity metal in its Tolleson plant.

We support the notion that the U.S. must increase its competitiveness in the market for rare earth elements and advanced materials.

We urge congress to take meaningful action to

  • reduce rare earth materials supply risk
  • level the playing field for rare earth materials and value added products made from them

Eutectix Tolleson Facility Celebrates 20 Years without a Lost Time Accident

Eutectix recently celebrated 20 years no time lost accidents at its Tolleson Arizona manufacturing facilities. Its facilities in Tolleson Arizona were first established in 1966 by Nuclear Corporation of America.

This plant has operated 20 years without a time lost accident.

This plant has operated 20 years without a time lost accident.

Our most important priority is the well-being of the dedicated and talented people that work together at Eutectix. They bring life to our company and prosperity to our community. We have a responsibility to make the most of the opportunity for our colleagues and ourselves. Focus on safety, quality, continuous improvement, and staff development make Eutectix a trusted supplier and an excellent place to work.

Eutectix, LLC manufactures superalloys, and custom rare earth metals and alloys using vacuum induction melting. It supplies high purity ingots and powder for advanced applications in hydrogen storage, magnets, batteries, and additive manufacturing.

Eutectix operates production facilities in Tolleson Arizona and Troy Michigan.


Learn About Eutectix Metal Alloys at TMS 2017

Join your colleagues at the TMS 2017 meeting in San Diego to learn about Eutectix metal alloys, rare earth metals and magnetic materials.

TMS2017 will present more than 65 symposia planned by all five TMS technical divisions and covering a broad range of topics related to minerals, metals, and materials science and engineering. The technical symposium topics cover additive manufacturing, energy materials, biomaterials and much more. Workshops, courses and tutorials for professional development start the day before the technical sessions.

TMS 2017 will be held February 26–March 2, 2017 • San Diego Convention Center and Marriott Marquis & Marina • San Diego, California

Let’s see what we can do together! Drop by booth 1008 to meet Dr. John de Neufville. Visitors will have a special opportunity to guess the composition of one of our alloys and win a prize.

 


Aluminum Market Statistics

Did you read, Aluminum Association “Aluminum Statistical Review“? It includes information on every cycle of the aluminum production process; from primary aluminum, to markets for finished goods, to the recovery of aluminum scrap. The Review is divided into five major sections: supply, shipments, markets, foreign trade, and world statistics. Its easy-to-read design includes text, tables and charts providing a valuable reference tool for members of the industry, financial analysts, government agencies, students, and the general public.

http://webstore.ansi.org/RecordDetail.aspx?sku=AA+ASR


New manufacturing approach slices lithium-ion battery cost in half

MIT News reports, “An advanced manufacturing approach for lithium-ion batteries, developed by researchers at MIT and at a spinoff company called 24M, promises to significantly slash the cost of the most widely used type of rechargeable batteries while also improving their performance and making them easier to recycle.

“We’ve reinvented the process,” says Yet-Ming Chiang, the Kyocera Professor of Ceramics at MIT and a co-founder of 24M (and previously a co-founder of battery company A123).”

 

http://mitei.mit.edu/news/new-manufacturing-approach-slices-lithium-ion-battery-cost-half#.VYnXJPaKSXM.twitter


Are You Following Hydrogen Storage Materials Research?

Did you read this hydrogen storage review? Thermodynamic Tuning of Mg-Based Hydrogen Storage Alloys: A Review Min Zhu, Yanshan Lu, Liuzhang Ouyang and Hui Wang Materials 2013, 6, 4574-4608; doi:10.3390/ma6104574

The article summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of altering the thermodynamics of Mg/MgH2 by alloying, nanostructuring, and changing the reaction pathway.


Hydrogen Storage Alloys Prepared by High-energy Milling

Have you read Hydrogen Storage Alloys Prepared by High-energy Milling https://lnkd.in/eFZj8ap

Two classes of the alloys were studied: AB2 type with atomic composition of (Ti0.5Zr0.5) (V0.68Mn0.68Cr0.34Ni0.7) and AB5 type with atomic composition of (Ce0.63La0.37)(Ni3.55Al0.3Mn0.4 Co0.75).

M. Staszewski, A. Sierczyńska, M. Kamińska, M. Osadnik, M. Czepelak, P. Swoboda, Hydrogen storage alloys prepared by high-energy milling, Journal of Achievements in Materials and Manufacturing Engineering 44/2 (2011) 154-160.


Attend 2015 MRS Spring Meeting & Exhibit

  • April 7-8, 2015
  • Moscone West San Francisco, California
  • Meeting Chairs: Artur Braun, Hongyou Fan, Ken Haenen, Lia Stanciu, Jeremy A. Theil

 

 

Planning to attend this year’s Materials Research Society Spring Meeting? See Eutectix at Booth 511 and let’s see what we can do together! Drop by the booth to meet Dr. John de Neufville. Visitors will have a special opportunity to guess the composition of one of our alloys and win a prize. We look forward to seeing you there.